Volume and Tone Announces "The Ramones" Guitar Strap

Volume and Tone is donating 30 percent of the proceeds to the MaxLove Project.

New York, NY (November 27, 2013) -- Volume & Tone is pleased to announce the release of “The Ramone” guitar strap, created in collaboration with fan favorite, Richie Ramone of The Ramones. This Strap is the first in a series of Celebrity Strap collaborations that Volume & Tone is launching, with 30% of all proceeds going to one of our favorite charities “The Maxlove Project."

The Maxlove Project was Inspired by SuperMax Wilford, a six-year-old fighting brain cancer, MaxLove Project is a 100% volunteer-driven, grassroots nonprofit organization founded to help SuperKids thrive against cancer and life-threatening conditions. Their mission is to provide families fighting childhood cancers with accessible, practical, and kid-friendly whole-body wellness.

“The Ramone” was designed to look and feel like the Schott Perfecto, America’s finest and most symbolic leather motorcycle jacket. Outsiders and lone wolves like Marlon Brando and Steve McQueen wore early versions of the jacket, and later The Ramones wore it as their unofficial uniform, and cemented the jacket’s reputation as a symbol of Rebellion.

At The MaxLove Project they’re inspired by hope. At Volume & Tone we are inspired by giving back.

Specs:

  • 100% Artisanal Vegetable Tanned Leather
  • Motorcycle Jacket Zipper Pocket Detail
  • Features Our Signature Pick Pocket
  • Measurements: 2 3/4" Wide x 66" Long Extended
  • 30 Percent Of Proceeds Go to The Maxlove Project

For more information:
Volume and Tone

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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