Source Audio’s new Aftershock may look like a pretty standard stompbox, but it remains true to the company’s long-standing MO of putting a ton of options at your fingertips.

A 3-way toggle rests in the middle of the drive, level, tone, and clean dials to select between tube, heavy, or fuzz voicings and access a wide grit landscape. On top of that, SA’s free (and user-friendly) Neuro Mobile App provides access to extended EQ functionality and a library of sound algorithms that can be called up and downloaded to the pedal from your device via the included cable.

I got to a buttery, warm break-up that emulated a pushed tube amp quite well with the toggle in the tube position, drive at 2 o’clock, clean at 9 o’clock, and tone at noon. Content as I was, I toggled far right to check out the fuzz engine, which delivered thick and spongy dirt that was spot-on for upbeat synth lines when I inched the drive close to max. Favorite presets dialed up through my phone included “Crunch Bass,” for its in-your-face, power-punk personality, and “Phat Lines,” for its tight-but-nasty synth tone.

I haven’t even touched on the heavy engine, the preset mode for on-the-fly switching, stereo-routing possibilities, and more. The Aftershock is packed, to be sure, and when you consider it can be had for $150, this could be the whole package you’re after.

Test gear: Orange O Bass, Gallien-Krueger 800RB head, TC Electronic RS410 cab.

Recorded direct using Orange O Bass into Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 interface into GarageBand.
Clip 1: Level 4 o’clock, drive 3 o’clock, tone 2 o’clock, toggle in fuzz position.
Clip 2: Phat Lines bass octave setting on iPhone Neuro app.


Impressive variety of usable tones and grit inside (and outside) this pedal. Priced nice.

Quite easy to go tweak geek, so don’t forget to put away the devices and play.


Source Audio Aftershock


Ease of Use: