DigiTech Introduces the Gunslinger MOSFET Distortion

A newly-designed circuit that can go from a touch of overdriven grit to full-bore high-gain saturation.

Frankfurt, Germany (April 20, 2015) -- HARMAN’s DigiTech today announced the debut of the DOD Gunslinger MOSFET Distortion, a pedal that’s locked and loaded for smoking guitar sounds at any setting. The Gunslinger employs a newly-designed MOSFET circuit to deliver a wide range of distortion tones from a touch of overdriven grit to full-bore high-gain saturation.

“The Gunslinger’s MOSFET circuit delivers saturated tones and touch sensitivity normally associated with tubes,” said Tom Cram, Marketing Manager, DigiTech. “The pedal is ideal for adding a little more complexity to already overdriven tones, or on its own for thick, rich chord rhythm crunch and singing high-gain lead tones.”

The Gunslinger’s Level and Drive knobs control the overall volume of the pedal and the amount of distortion. High output enables it to push a tube amp over the edge for raw, high-powered overdrive sound and deliver a massive volume boost for high-velocity solos. Even at its highest gain settings, the Gunslinger maintains its touch sensitivity and separation between notes. The pedal’s Low and High controls enable the player to adjust the amount of bass and treble, to achieve the perfect tonal balance with any guitar, amp and rig.

The Gunslinger offers a choice of 9 to 18 volt operation, which lets the player choose between normal operation and running the pedal with more headroom for a less compressed, tighter and more open tone.

The DOD Gunslinger offers true bypass operation to keep the instrument’s tone pristine when the effect is disengaged and its brushed-metal housing looks as tough as the pedal sounds.

The DOD Gunslinger MOSFET Distortion will be available in May 2015 at a suggested retail price of $124.94.

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DigiTech

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