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Fender Releases ’68 Custom Series Amplifiers

Fender reissues the "silver-face" versions of the Twin Reverb, Deluxe Reverb, and the Princeton Reverb.

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Fender '68 Custom Deluxe Reverb

Scottsdale, AZ (October 10, 2013) -- Fender is proud to announce the ’68 Custom series amplifiers, which consist of the ’68 Custom Twin Reverb, ’68 Custom Deluxe Reverb and ’68 Custom Princeton Reverb models.

1968 was a transitional year for Fender amps, with tone that was still pure Fender, but a look that was brand new. With a silver-and-turquoise front panel and classy aluminum “drip edge” grille cloth trim, ’68 Custom amps pay tribute to the classic look, sound and performance of Fender’s late-‘60s “silver-face” amps, but feature a special twist.

Both channels boast reverb and tremolo, and the “custom” channels have modified Bassman tone stacks that give modern players greater tonal flexibility with pedals. In addition, all models include custom-made Schumacher transformers (like the originals), tube-driven spring reverb and Celestion speakers, which deliver a more distinctively rock ‘n’ roll flavor.

The Twin Reverb remained the backline amp of choice for pros and amateurs everywhere. Clear, deep and powerful, it produced big tube tone, with world-class Fender reverb and vibrato effects. For countless guitarists ever since, the Twin Reverb has been the go-to amp for classic Fender sound. The ’68 Custom Twin Reverb Amp pushes 85 watts of tube power through dual 12” Celestion G12V-70 speakers and features.

The Deluxe Reverb remained the ideal recording and performing amp. Small, light and moderately powered, it produced big tube tone. The ’68 Custom Deluxe Reverb Amp is a 22 watt amp with a single 12” Celestion G12V-70 speaker.

The Princeton Reverb remained the perfect recording amp. The ’68 Custom Princeton Reverb is a 12-watt amp that features one 10” Celestion TEN 30 speaker.

For more information:
Fender

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