G&L Introduces the Tribute Series S-500

The new G&L Tribute Series S-500 delivers the power of MFD pickups mellowed by the porosity of a mahogany body.

Fullerton, CA  (August 20, 2012) – The G&L S-500 debuted in 1983 as Leo Fender’s own evolution of the double-cutaway bolt-on axe, showcasing his G&L innovations including the Dual-Fulcrum vibrato and Magnetic Field Design single-coil pickups. These MFD pickups deliver a sparkly top end and robust bottom end without losing midrange focus. Supported by the S-500’s PTB (Passive Treble and Bass), a wide range of tones can be dialed in from traditional glassy to all-out punch. A push-pull expander switch on the volume pot allows additional pickup combinations of neck+bridge and all three pickups together.

The new G&L Tribute Series S-500 delivers the quintessential modern Leo experience with a twist that harkens back to one of his favorite pairings: the power of MFD pickups mellowed by the porosity of a mahogany body.

Leo Fender’s forward-looking spirit is clearly embodied in the G&L S-500, a guitar he designed for players with a progressive mindset. And with a suggested retail price of just $787, the new G&L Tribute Series S-500 makes authentic Latter-Day-Leo flavor affordable to every working musician.

Available in:
• Tobacco Sunburst over mahogany, 3-ply black pickguard, tinted gloss neck finish, rosewood fingerboard.
• Vintage White over mahogany, 3-ply white pickguard, tinted gloss neck finish, rosewood fingerboard.

For more information:
www.glguitars.com

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