The company's first acoustic bass features a scaled-down body with a solid mahogany top and a Fishman Sonitone preamp system.

Los Angeles, CA (March 2, 2020) -- Orangewood Guitars announced today the launch of the Oliver Jr. Bass, their first acoustic bass, as a special release within their signature Overland Collection. The mini bass is modeled after Orangewood’s fan favorite Oliver Jr. Guitar model with a scaled-down body and impressive full-size voice. For players looking for a well-balanced acoustic bass option, the Oliver Jr. Bass is a winning combination of high-quality playability and affordability.

The Oliver Jr. Bass is made with a solid mahogany top to enhance the punchiness in the low to mid-range and to add a “woody” tonal texture. In addition, every bass comes with a Fishman Sonitone Preamp System for gigging bassists looking to amplify their sound. With a shorter scale and lightweight body, the Oliver Jr. Bass was designed for easy portability and a comfortable hold.

Key Features:

  • Top: Solid Mahogany
  • Back / Sides: Layered Mahogany
  • Fretboard: Ovangkol
  • Nut / Saddle: Bone
  • Nut Width: 43mm
  • Scale Length: 23-½”
  • Finish: Natural Satin Finish
  • Pickup: Fishman Sonitone
  • Strings: Ernie Ball Earthwood Phosphor Bronze Acoustic Bass Strings
  • Gig Bag Included

The Oliver Jr. Bass is priced at $345 and will be available online starting February 27 at www.orangewoodguitars.com – with free shipping to customers in the USA. Affirm payment plans available.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Orangewood Guitars

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