Outlaw Effects Unveils the Rocker Box Tremolo and Deputy Marshal Plexi Distortion

Both micro pedals feature true-bypass switching to maintain the purity of the player's tone.

Montreal, Canada (January 3, 2017) -- Micro-effect pedal company Outlaw Effects will introduce a pair of new analog guitar pedals at the 2017 NAMM Show: Rocker Box tremolo and Deputy Marshal plexi distortion.

Rocker Box is an optical tremolo pedal that allows players to unearth rich, natural sounding tremolo effects. A Bias control adjusts the tonal complexion of the sound wave, giving the player access to everything from smooth and polished trem to the looser, non-symmetrical waveforms of vintage tube amps. Depth and Speed controls offer the ability to further fine-tune the effect.

The pedal was named via the company's recent #NameThisOutlaw Instagram contest, with the winning entry submitted by Andrew Dixon (@andycd26) of Ohio.

Suggested Retail Price: $60.00

Deputy Marshal captures the unmistakable sound of Plexi-era British tube amps that defined the classic rock era. With plenty of power and bite, Deputy Marshal offers full-stack character without the vintage amp price tag. Standard Gain, Tone and Volume controls allow the player to dial in his or her distortion tone with precision. A Bright/Normal toggle switch offers even more versatility, with beefed-up highs just a flick of a switch away.

Suggested Retail Price: $60.00

Both pedals feature true bypass switching to maintain the purity of the player's clean tone. Like all Outlaw Effects, the two new pedals are housed in a micro-sized durable aluminum alloy chassis, and feature a staggered input/output design for a minimum footprint.

Rocker Box and Deputy Marshal will begin shipping to dealers in February 2017.

For more information:
Outlaw Effects

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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