The 13-Fret guitar has a 4/12” deep body for extra tone and projection in a small-body instrument with vintage styling.

Hayward, CA (March 5, 2012) -- Recording King’s new 13-Fret Greenwich Village has a 4/12” deep body for extra tone and projection in a small-body instrument with vintage styling.

In the spirit of one of the most famous “lost” guitars in history, the Greenwich Village has loads of vintage vibe and tone. With an extra-deep body, 13-fret neck joint and classic Recording King headstock, this guitar honors both Golden Age film troubadours like Nick Lucas and historic folk singers from the 1960s. The 4-1/2” deep body gives it extra projection, the 13-fret neck and bridge placement makes for perfect resonance across all registers, and the 25.4” dreadnought scale length gives it added punch and volume.

The Greenwich Village comes with your choice of all-solid (RNJ-26) with a solid Sitka spruce top and solid African Mahogany back and sides, or solid top (RNJ-17) with a solid Sitka top and Rosewood back and sides. The 1-3/4” bone nut is perfectly comfortable for fingerpicking or strumming and both Greenwich Village models come with a traditional firestripe pickguard and Bell Flower and Diamond fretboard inlay for an added touch of classic style.

The Greenwich Village is an eye-catching and great-sounding departure from cookie-cutter dreadnoughts.You’ll be impressed that a small-body instrument has this much tuneful volume.

The Greenwich Village starts at a street price of $549.99 with solid Sitka top and Rosewood back and sides, and comes with Recording King's industry-leading lifetime warranty.

Watch Recording King's demo of the Greenwich Village:

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Recording King

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