Premier Guitar's Jason Shadrick is On Location at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois, where he catches up with Justin Derrico and Eva Gardner on tour with Pink's The Truth About Love tour. In this segment, Justin and Eva detail their go-to instruments and signal chains.

Premier Guitar's Jason Shadrick is On Location at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois, where he catches up with Justin Derrico and Eva Gardner on tour with Pink's The Truth About Love tour. In this segment, Justin and Eva detail their go-to instruments and signal chains.



Guitars
Derrico brings about 10 axes on tour with Pink, sometimes traveling with a backup boat of 10 more. A majority of them are Gibson Les Pauls, along with a Fender Strat, Valley Arts Brent Mason, and a duo of Maton acoustics. His main LP (used for about 80 percent of the show) is 2006 Les Paul Standard that is totally stock—outside of a few repairs to the headstock and a piezo pickup. His Fender Custom Shop Strat Pro is used for the cover of Chris Isaak's "Wicked Game." On the Valley Arts, he uses the neck pickup with the controls (including the middle pickup blend) all the way up.

Amps and Effects
For this leg, Derrico brings out two complete rigs, "A" and "B" both are exactly the same and are centered around Bogner and Friedman amps. For pedals, he has a Wampler Ego Compressor, Bogner Ecstasy Blue, Xotic BB Preamp, MXR Custom Badass Modified OD, Boss Giga-Delay, Foxrox Octron, Electro-Harmonix Micro Pog, Boss BF-3 Flanger, Boss TU-2 tuner, MXR EVH Phase 90, Fulltone Deja Vibe, and a Line 6 M5. Around the back he has a Boss CH-1 Super Chorus.

Up front, Derrico's pedalboard is designed around a Dave Friedman-designed rig. The heart of the on-stage setup is his Voodoo Lab Ground Control Pro which is programmed with individual patches for each song along with direct access buttons to control the pedals in his rack. He also relies on a Dunlop Cry Baby wah, two Ernie Ball Volume pedals, a custom designed piezo signal splitter (which works with his stereo cable), a Boss TU-3 tuner, and a Fishman preamp.

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