St. Vincent and Ernie Ball Music Man Announce Release of Limited-Edition 'Masseduction' Signature Guitar

Only twelve of the guitars will be sold globally through select music instrument retailers.

Los Angeles, CA (September 14, 2017) -- St. Vincent is releasing a strictly limited edition ‘MASSEDUCTION’ neon version of her Ernie Ball Music Man signature guitar to coincide with the release of her new album of the same name. The aesthetic is an extension of the unique visual world of ‘MASSEDUCTION.’ The guitar is available in four neon colors: blue, lime, pink and orange (with leopard print pick guard). The guitar also comes with a deluxe vinyl copy of ‘MASSEDUCTION’ and a signed back plate.

Only twelve of the guitars will be sold globally through select music instrument retailers. Five more guitars will be given away to lucky winners. Contesting details will follow in the coming weeks.

Starting at $2499.

St. Vincent’s new album ‘MASSEDUCTION’ will be released October 13 on Loma Vista Recordings and an international tour begins October 7 in Los Angeles.

Envisioned and designed by Grammy Award-winning guitarist St. Vincent ("Annie" Clark) with support from the award-winning engineering team at Ernie Ball Music Man, the unique electric guitar was crafted to perfectly fit her form, playing technique and personal style. Crafted in Ernie Ball Music Man's San Luis Obispo, California factory, the production model St. Vincent Signature is available in stealth black, tobacco burst, heritage red, polaris white, or custom Vincent Blue, a color hand-mixed by Annie.

Featuring an African mahogany body, Ernie Ball Music Man tremolo, satin finished maple neck that matches the body, ebony fretboard, St. Vincent inlays, Schaller locking tuners, 5-way pick up selector with custom configuration and 3-mini humbuckers, and a signed back plate. The guitar also comes complete with Ernie Ball Regular Slinky guitar strings and hardshell case.

For more information:
Ernie Ball Music Man

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