Ampeg Unveils the SCR-DI

A potent combination of preamp, EQ pedal, and overdrive built for the stage.

Anaheim, CA (January 23, 2015) -- Ampeg today announces the release of the all-new SCR-DI Bass DI with Scramblerâ„¢ Overdrive. The first pedal Ampeg has released in years, the SCR-DI combines a classic Ampeg preamp, EQ pedal and overdrive stomp box in a rugged design built to deliver Ampeg tone in any situation.

"The SCR-DI is the most bass-friendly DI ever created," remarks Ampeg Product Manager Zane Williams. "It delivers a huge range of classic Ampeg tones, it's an EQ pedal, it's got fantastic overdrive...it's got everything a performing bass player needs."

The Ampeg SCR-DI Bass DI with Scrambler Overdrive is a true Ampeg preamp, with legacy preamp and tone stack circuits, providing a wide choice of authentic Ampeg tones. The EQ section features a 3-band EQ with Ampeg's famed Ultra-Hi and Ultra-Lo circuits for flexible tone shaping. The EQ section is footswitchable, perfect for switching between distinct tones during a live performance. Also featured is the completely new Bass Scrambler overdrive circuit, specifically tailored to deliver true SVT grit, grind and sag. The overdrive section is also footswitchable, so players can add overdrive as needed.

The ideal DI box for any Ampeg lover, SCR-DI delivers connection options perfect for driving any bass rig and feeding a bassist's effected signal right to front-of-house. Plus, its portable, compact design fits easily onto a pedal board, and can tuck away into a gig bag for transport. The SCR-DI is also a great practice tool, with a dedicated headphone out and aux in for playing along with backing tracks.

"It's great to be able to practice with the same gear you use when performing. The SCR-DI is perfect for silent practice on the road or at home," remarks Williams. "You know you will always have the tone you want, no matter where you are playing."

Available beginning April, 2015

$279.99

For more information:
Ampeg

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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