Fender Telecaster Deluxe with Curtis Novak Wide Range pickups through '68 Bassman.
Rhythm track features bridge pickup with fuzz at maximum and volume at 50%. Lead track features neck pickup with fuzz at maximum and volume at 50%.

 

Ratings

Pros:
Throaty, substantial, and authentically buzzing ’60s fuzz voice. Loud for a Fuzzrite. Clean and sturdy build.

Cons:
None.

Street:
$113

Blackbird Savoy
ananashead.com



Tones:


Ease of Use:


Build/Design:


Value:
 

The Mosrite Fuzzrite might be the punkiest garage-punk fuzz. It’s famously associated with biker-fuzz godfather Davie Allan and Iron Butterfly’s “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida,” Some speculate that the early Stooges and Buffalo Springfield were adopters. What’s beyond doubt is that a good Fuzzrite or clone delivers the buzzing spirit of ’66 with ease and attitude. And the Barcelona-built and super affordable Ananashead Effects Meteorite is most certainly a top-flight silicon Fuzzrite clone.

For starters, it’s beautifully built. A handful of components are tidily hand-populated on a through-hole circuit board the size of a couple postage stamps. Jacks and switches are chassis mounted. It’s a sturdy little pedal.

The sounds are robust, too, thanks to an extra gain stage that boosts the Meteorite to louder-than-your-average-’Rite levels without sacrificing the reedy, focused heat that defines the type. Though the range of fuzz colors isn’t wide, there are cool, if subtle, variations to explore. Maximum gain settings add a layer of sizzle on top of a perfectly balanced and substantial foundation of throaty low-mids and white-hot high-midrange. Less gain gives you more contoured and concise takes on the same recipe that are killer for choogling rhythm moves. At around 110 bucks, it’s a steal, too.

Test gear: Fender Telecaster Deluxe with Curtis Novak Widerange humbuckers, Fender Jazzmaster, ’68 Fender Bassman, Fender Vibro Champ