1964 Fender Stratocaster Lake Placid Blue Serial #L20674

A gorgeous custom color ''64 Strat


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The innovative Fender Stratocaster, introduced in 1954, is the most popular electric guitar today. The basic design has been unchanged for nearly six decades, and it continues to serve the needs of modern players.

This month’s featured guitar is a gorgeous custom color Fender Strat. Besides having a stunning Lake Placid Blue finish, this February 1964 guitar has other features that make it very desirable: Spaghetti Logo (phased out in ’64), clay dots (replaced by pearloid dots in ’65), single line Kluson Deluxe tuning machines (replaced by double line Klusons during ’64), and a greenish celluloid pickguard (replaced by white in ’65).


The guitar’s previous owner acquired it in 1967 while serving in the US Marines. His Commanding Officer had a gambling problem and was forced sell the Strat and an Epiphone amp for $175 to help settle his debts. The guitar has been played quite a bit since then, but was also very well taken care of.

To find more minute details about Fender Stratocasters, check out The Fender Stratocaster by A.R. Duchossoir.



Dave's Guitar Shop
Daves Roger’s Collection Is tended to by Laun Braithwaite & Tim Mullally
All photos credit Tim Mullally
Dave’s Collection is on dispay at:
Dave's Guitar Shop
1227 Third Street South
La Crosse, WI 54601
608-785-7704
davesguitar.com
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