Prog-metal architect Aaron Marshall shows off a pair of dazzling Mayones prototypes before he explains using a small digital footprint for tons of tones.

After the dissolution of his previous band, Speak of the Devil, Aaron Marshall forged out on his own and created Intervals in 2011. (Through the band’s existence, Marshall has remained the sole constant member and is the band’s musical pilot.)

The instrumental band is like a robust jambalaya. It uses ingredients from prog, metal, djent, jazz, and even top-40 pop to make its own cosmic stew. After two instrumental EPs—The Space Between (2011) In Time (2012)—he recruited vocalist Mike Semesky and released their 2014 full-length debut, A Voice Within. Aaron Marshall decided the best version of Intervals was that eschewing vocals and moved on to release two more LPs in 2015 (The Shape of Colour) and 2017 (The Way Forward). Each release has seen Marshall (and the culminating tours with various bandmates) push further through the prog glass-ceiling with a no-holds-barred approach redefining themselves, and the resulting genre.

During the band’s run opening for co-headliners Chon and Between the Buried and Me at Nashville’s Marathon Music Works, Intervals ringleader Aaron Marshall spoke with PG’s Perry Bean. The Canadian details his new custom builds from Mayones, talks about the power and freedom the Axe-Fx III gives his band, and even explains how NYSYNC, TLC, and Destiny’s Child still influence him today.


Click below to listen wherever you get your podcasts:

Listen on Apple PodcastsListen on Google Podcasts
Listen on StitcherListen on Spotify

D'Addario XT Strings:https://ddar.io/XT.RR



Want to play different pedal sequences in a flash? These handy boxes provide more tone solutions than you might realize.

There is no right or wrong way to wire a pedalboard. It’s really a matter of personal taste and what our ears find pleasing. Every musician has their own thing, and our pedalboards are certainly an extension of that. For some, reconfiguring the pedalboard is a lifelong process, and adding a new device often means something has got to go, because real estate is crucial!

Read MoreShow less

Misfits guitarist Doyle Wolfgang Von Frankenstein unveils a new line of strings, collaborating with Josh Vittek of Sheptone.

Read MoreShow less

My years-long search for the “right” Bigsby-outfitted box finally paid off. Now how do I make this sumbitch work in my band?

Considering the amount of time I’ve spent (here and elsewhere) talking about and lusting after Gretsch hollowbody guitars, it’s taken me a remarkably long time to end up with a big Bigsby-outfitted box I truly love. High-end Gretsches are pricey enough that, for a long time, I just couldn’t swing it. Years ago I had an Electromatic for a while, and it looked and played lovely, but didn’t have the open, blooming acoustic resonance I hoped for. A while later, I reviewed the stellar Players Edition Broadkaster semi-hollow, and it was so great in so many ways that I set my sights on it, eventually got one, and adore it to this day. Yet the full-hollowbody lust remained.

Read MoreShow less
x