Gibson Releases the Les Paul Recording

Two pickups route through a Jensen audio transformer for a balanced low-impedance output that can go direct into pro mixers or computer audio interfaces.

Nashville, TN (January 3, 2014) -- A major part of Les Paul’s original vision for the solidbody electric guitar was to incorporate features crucial to studio musicians, and that dream was realized in the famed Les Paul Recording Model of the 1970s. The new Les Paul Recording guitar from Gibson USA—hand-crafted, American-made, and impressively affordable—pays tribute to Les’s original concept while adding key updates for superior sound and performance.

The Les Paul Recording couples Gibson’s legendary tone and playability with the very best of today’s electronics to create a dream instrument for studio guitarists. Two versatile new pickups route through a premium, industry-standard Jensen audio transformer for a balanced low-impedance output that can go direct into pro mixers or computer audio interfaces. Or, select the High-Z out for traditional guitar amps. “Fat Tap” coil splitting on each pickup, a phase-reverse switch, and ground lift switch for the Low-Z output dramatically extend the Les Paul Recording’s versatility.

Select Grade-A mahogany and a Grade-A rosewood fingerboard, with frets over binding for extended playing surface, form an unbeatable foundation; Grover kidney-button tuners, a Tune-o-matic bridge, and a classic Bigsby B-7 vibrato tailpiece provide accurate tuning with serious sustain. The high-gloss natural nitrocellulose lacquer finish lets the wood’s natural beauty shine through, while a multi-ply bound body and headstock, “Custom” style split-diamond headstock inlay, and small pearloid block fingerboard inlays complete this first-class musical instrument.

To experience the unique recording excellence of the Les Paul Recording, visit your authorized Gibson USA dealer today.

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