Nordstrand Audio Releases the Big BladeMan

The essence of the pickup's tone starts with a custom-designed 3B preamp.

Redlands, CA (August 25, 2017) -- Beware - this pickup emits an unsettling amount of raw power, creating the possibility that those who wield the Big BladeMan may engage in band practices and performances that may singe the frayed ends of corrosive frequency. This pickup’s power is enhanced by filtering its aggression through a custom tailored 3B preamp, which adds a depth of fury to its already candescent vigor by perpetuating its hunger for the destruction of sounds weakly whispered. The Big BladeMan is the Papa of our up and coming blade arsenal, and is all knowing and all powerful in terms of what the blade line stands for tonally: mean, gritty, big, powerful, bombastic, and loud. This pickup combined with its own custom preamp will not disappoint any player looking to desecrate the silence of the lambs.

The birth of the Big Blade Man was catalyzed by a conversation with Tool’s Justin Chancellor. Through using Justin’s famous tone as a base for shaping the pickup’s sonic character, Carey was able to come up with a design combining the Nordstrand aesthetic with Justin’s edgy and powerful bass lines. Essentially, through using the power we have discovered within the prospects of our various blade designs, Carey attempted to Nordify a few details within Justin’s sound.

Extensively designed, tested and built in the Nordstrand shop in Redlands, California. These pickups are available now at NordstrandAudio.com and select dealers. Street prices start at $169 per set.

Technical Details:

  • 2 Big J-Blades in an MM cover
  • Drop-in replacement 4-String and 5-string MM bass pickup
  • Ceramic magnets
  • Laser cut vulcanized fiber bobbins
  • Wax-potted to contain any unruly frequency that may attempt to desecrate your desired tone

For more information:
Nordstrand Audio

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