Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

Tools for the Task: Pedalboard Power

Ten options for fueling your pedalboard population.

You may have taken on a new pedal or five after checking out all the reviews in the October 2016 issue, but when was the last time you assessed your power needs? We’ve rounded up 10 power supply units this month—big to small and loaded to simple—that are poised to serve as the heart of your pedalboard.  

Pigtronix Power

Able to power up to eight pedals, the fully isolated power outlets on this supply (four of which are switchable between 9V, 12V, 15V, and 18V) ensure stable power and ultra-low noise.

PIGTRONIX
$299

Powerbox Mk2

This unit houses five galvanically isolated output groups and can power up to 10 pedals. The output voltage of three of the five groups can be changed via the DIP switches located topside.

N-AUDIO ELECTRONICS
$207

Ojai

This pint-sized powerhouse is part of an expandable and modular system, and has five high-current, individually isolated, ultra-low-noise outputs to help pedals achieve their highest dynamic range.

STRYMON
$149

PB-107/Power Box Lithium

Via the included 8-plug daisy chain cable, this rechargeable power supply takes care of pedal-powering needs while displaying battery status, current draw, and time remaining.

BIG JOE STOMP BOX COMPANY
$149

1 Spot Pro CS12

This power brick features 12 isolated outputs, five voltage options to power just about any pedal, switchable input voltage, and includes brackets to mount under Pedaltrain pedalboards.

TRUETONE
$179

Provolt9

This unit employs star grounding—rather than parallel connections—to suppress unwanted hum, and provides a consistent, ideal 9.6V to each of its six outputs.

PROVIDENCE
$149

Kerosene

Housed in a rugged aluminum alloy chassis, this micro-sized power supply can help clean up power-cord and pedalboard clutter with its tiny footprint, while still offering eight 9V DC outputs.

OUTLAW EFFECTS
$65

Adam

Small and flat enough to tuck under the tiniest of pedalboards, this power supply offers a pair of fixed 9V outlets and a second pair that are both configurable to 9V or 12V.

CIOKS
$109

Phoenix

So you have a lot of pedals. Not a problem for this 15-output power supply that uses two internal custom-wound toroidal transformers to deliver ultra-clean power and superior noise filtering.

WALRUS AUDIO
$279

Pedal Power 2 Plus

All eight outputs on this handmade power supply are completely isolated to eliminate tone robbing, prevent hum, and allow combining of outputs to create different voltages.

VOODOO LAB
$169
Caleb Followill's Kings of Leon Live Rig Explained
Caleb Followill's Kings of Leon Live Rig Explained by Builder Xact Tone Solutions' Barry O'Neal

The Xact Tone Solutions chief pedal puzzle solver Barry O'Neal goes over the gear in Caleb Followill's rack and explains all the ins and outs of its configuration to pull off the Can We Please Have Fun tour hitting U.S. arenas this summer and fall.

Alex LIfeson, Victor

Anthem Records in Canada and Rhino Records will reissue the first-ever solo albums of Rush's Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee. Lifeson’s 1996 album Victor and Lee’s 2000 offering My Favourite Headache will be re-released on August 9, 2024.

Read MoreShow less

George Benson’s Dreams Do Come True: When George Benson Meets Robert Farnonwas recorded in 1989. The collaboration came about after Quincy Jones told the guitarist that Farnon was “the greatest arranger in all the world.”

Photo by Matt Furman

The jazz-guitar master and pop superstar opens up the archive to release 1989’s Dreams Do Come True: When George Benson Meets Robert Farnon, and he promises more fresh collab tracks are on the way.

“Like everything in life, there’s always more to be discovered,”George Benson writes in the liner notes to his new archival release, Dreams Do Come True: When George Benson Meets Robert Farnon. He’s talking about meeting Farnon—the arranger, conductor, and composer with credits alongside Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, and Vera Lynn, among many others, plus a host of soundtracks—after Quincy Jones told the guitarist he was “the greatest arranger in all the world.”

Read MoreShow less

The new Jimi Hendrix documentary chronicles the conceptualization and construction of the legendary musician’s recording studio in Manhattan that opened less than a month before his untimely death in 1970. Watch the trailer now.

Read MoreShow less