Analog Alien Unveils the EPI

A high-end routing pedal that enables you to take the signal from your effects pedal and record it directly into your DAW or analog tape deck.

Long Island, NY (January 1, 2019) -- Analog Alien Guitar Pedals has joined forces with legendary pro-audio designer Paul Wolff, of Fix Audio, to creat the EPI (Effects Pedal Interface).

The EPI is a high-end routing pedal that enables you to take the signal from your effects pedal and record it directly into your DAW or analog tape deck, professionally - without any loss of signal or fidelity. The EPI does this by automatically adjusting the impedance and voltage levels coming from your effectspedals, so that they will interface properly with professional recording studio levels. The EPI also has -10 dBu RCA input and output jacks for connection to non-professional signal operating levels.

The EPI has two separate insertion points that are independent of each other - A&B. These insertion points enable you to set up two separate signal chains and switch between either of them, or have them both on at that sametime. You can blend both signal paths independently from each other, and then combine them at the balanced XLR, buffered 1/4" or -10 dBu RCA outputs.

The EPI will enable to use your efefcts pedals in ways you’ve never even thought of.

Features:

  • Using the EPI as a Direct Box
  • Re-Amping
  • Dual Effects Loop Insertion with or without Effect at Gtr Input, and on the Thru Ouput
  • Tri & Quad Amp Output Configurations
  • Six Output Configuration: Using either the 1/4” Gtr Input, or XLR Balanced Input
  • Using the EPI with a 500 Series Rack
  • Adding Effects Pedals to a Pre-recorded Track
  • Using the EPI Return Insertion Jacks as a Summing Box
  • For DJs, Turntablists, and DJ Composers: Using the EPI to add Effects Pedal and/or Instruments to Your Rig - in a Mono Configuration
  • For DJs, Turntablists, and DJ Composers: Adding Effects and/or Instruments while using 1/4” or XLR Outputs from Your Controller or Mixer - in a Stereo Configuration
  • For DJs, Turntablists, and DJ Composers: Adding Effects and/or Instruments while using RCA Outputs from your Controller or Mixer- in a Stereo Configuration

Street Price: $349.00

For more information:
Analog Alien

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