Diago Unveils Sprinter Pedalboard

Large enough to hold four standard pedals and comes with a lightweight soft case.

Garforth, UK (June 24, 2015) -- The Diago Sprinter is a small ultra-portable pedal board with a tough, light-weight soft case. It is designed for when travelling light or when space is at a premium such as fly gigs, practising or low key events.

The board is large enough to hold up to four standard sized pedals or six micro pedals, plus a compact power supply. Like its bigger brother the Diago ‘Commuter', it is machined from HDF for low weight and high rigidity and has six large flat rubber pads on the bottom to give a low profile platform with great stability. The entire top surface is covered in looped pedal carpet material so that your pedals can be put exactly where you want them, and stay firmly attached.

The bag is made from tough nylon and padded all over with a resilient EPE interlayer, with a zip going down 3 edges to give easy access to your board and is big enough to accommodate the board and most pedals. It has an integrated carry handle and a removable, adjustable shoulder strap to make carrying comfortable and easy, and also comes with a 2 metre roll of velcro for your pedals, so there should be plenty to re-do your board a number of times or swap out your various pedals. There's also a lightweight flap pocket on the inside that can be used to hold strings, picks or other small accessories.

Specifications:

Pedalboard

  • Dimensions - 390 x 160mm. Includes 2m of 25mm wide adhesive backed velcro hook material
  • Will hold a single row of around 4 x standard sized pedals /6 x micro sized pedals plus Diago power supply.

Bag

  • Dimensions (internal) - 400 x 170 x 90mm.
  • Shoulder strap included.

For more information:
Diago

Photo 1

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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