Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

Eventide Releases Software Updates for Stompbox Line

Eventide Releases Software Updates for Stompbox Line

The new features announced are available immediately for H9 with a public beta to begin in August for ModFactor, TimeFactor, PitchFactor and Space.

Little Ferry, NJ (August 19, 2015) -- Eventide today announced the release of software updates for all of its stompboxes. Eventide stompboxes are being used by thousands of artists worldwide and many of these artists have requested additional features to help them use our products in new ways. The new features announced are available immediately for H9 with a public beta to begin in August for ModFactor, TimeFactor, PitchFactor and Space.

Routing Wet/Dry

This update also adds another routing option -- the ability to use one channel for effects (Wet) and the other as an unaltered passthrough (Dry). This gives studio and live musicians options for things like re-amping, testing house mix levels and so on.

Software-based Routing

All routing is completely software based and saved with each preset. There’s no need to reach down to throw a switch to change routing when a preset is selected, it’s set in advance along with your presets.

Volume Swell

Our customers also asked us for the ability to use an expression pedal (or MIDI controller) to control the signal level. The new Swell feature provides that option. You now have the option, by preset, of placing Swell on either the input or output signal.

MIDI Merge/Aux Switch Options

Finally, the update delivers two other requested enhancements: MIDI Merge and a Press & Hold option for auxiliary (aux) switches. The MIDI Merge feature will mix incoming MIDI signals and MIDI signals that it generates and send the result to the outputs. This will be of particular interest to people driving multiple stompboxes from a MIDI pedalboard. The new Aux Switch configuration adds the ability to press and hold a switch (Momentary) in addition to the existing on and off states (Latch). For instance, you can have a parameter change only while the switch is being held. This allows modulating wet/dry mix or any other parameter knob just by holding or tapping on the Aux Switch.

“The features we’ve added are not superficial, run-of-the-mill additions or bug fixes typical of software updates. We’ve had to dig deep into the code. The scale of these changes demanded a significant investment in development and testing, but the results should open up new creative options for musicians,” commented Nick Rose, Senior Product Developer. “Eventide has a long tradition of supporting its products many years after release. Decades, even. We understand people have paid hard-earned money and we want them to get the most out of that investment.”

These updates are free and are available immediately for the H9 by downloading the latest version of the H9 Control application (Mac, PC or iOS). Open beta testing will begin in August for the TimeFactor, ModFactor, PitchFactor and Space pedals with a release to follow.

For more information:
Eventide

On her new record with her trio, Molly Miller executes a live-feeling work of structural harmony that mirrors her busy life.

Photo by Anna Azarov

The accomplished guitarist and teacher’s new record, like her lifestyle, is taut and exciting—no more, and certainly no less, than is needed.

Molly Miller, a self-described “high-energy person,” is fully charged by the crack of dawn. When Ischeduled our interview, she opted for the very first slot available—8:30 a.m.—just before her 10 a.m. tennis match!

Read MoreShow less

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard started out as a “joke” band. As guitarist/songwriter Joey Walker says with a grin, “Now the joke’s on us.”

Photo by Maclay Heriot

With their 26th release, Flight b741, the prog-rockers make it hard but highly rewarding for fans to keep up. Behind that drive lies a wealth of joy, camaraderie, and unwavering commitment to their art.

There’s a dangerous, pernicious myth, seemingly spread in perpetuity among fledgling artists and music fans alike, that when you’re a musician, inspiration—and therefore productivity—comes naturally. Making art is the opposite of work, and, conversely, we know what happens to Jack when there’s all work and no play. But what happens when the dimensions of work and play fuse together like time and space? What happens to Jack then? Well, behind such an instance of metaphysical reaction, undoubtedly, would be King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard.

Read MoreShow less

Andy Timmons records rare Lennon/McCartney song "I'm In Love" at Abbey Road's Studio Two.

Read MoreShow less

Ted’s to-go kits: the silver box and the Big Black Bag.

Traveling with a collection of spare essentials—from guitar and mic cables to extension cords, capos, tuners, and maybe even a mini-amp—can be the difference between a show and a night of no-go.

Anyone who’s seen a spy flick or caper movie knows about go bags—the always-packed-and-ready duffles or attachés filled with passports, a few weapons, and cash that’s ready to grab and run with when the hellhounds are on your trail. As guitar players, we also need go bags, but their contents are less dramatic, unless, maybe, you’re playing a Corleone-family wedding.

Read MoreShow less