Hal Leonard Publishes "The Rickenbacker Electric Bass - 50 Years as Rock’s Bottom" Book

Hal Leonard releases a definitive book on Rickenbacker basses.

Montclair, NJ (June 27, 2013) -- Ever since the mid-1950s, Rickenbacker basses have been establishing the musical bottom for rock, jazz, and funk. Rickenbacker’s iconic 4001 bass is just one of nearly 40 distinct models produced in the last six decades. Players and collectors have longed for a reference for the different models, features, finishes, and details. The Rickenbacker Electric Bass – 50 Years As Rock’s Bottom provides hundreds of color photos and descriptions, along with the history to sort out the legend from the lore.

“I took a ‘field guide’ approach to the content, not just providing the history and photos. Each model is illustrated with an ‘identifying features’ page that uses close-up photos and callouts to point out ‘field marks’ of that particular Rickenbacker bass model,” says author and Rickenbacker aficionado Paul Boyer.

This book is for people like Boyer: bass players and collectors. But musical instrument dealers, pawn shops, and auction houses will also find the book of great help when assessing instruments. “There have been several books on Rickenbacker guitars,” Boyer explains, “and some of them include mentions of the basses. There are lots of books on electric basses, and some of them include mentions of Rickenbacker basses. But my book is the only one devoted only to Rickenbacker basses.”

The Rickenbacker Electric Bass - 50 years as Rock’s Bottom traces the history of the iconic guitar, from its prototypes through its explosion of popularity in such bands as the Beatles, Yes, Deep Purple, and Motörhead. Lavishly illustrated with archival shots, this is a must-have book not only for anyone who plays the Rick but for all bass players and those interested in the instruments played by rock heroes of the 1960s through the present.

For more information:
The Rickenbacker Electric Bass - 50 years as Rock’s Bottom

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
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