Railhammer Pickups Unveils the Alnico Grande

A pickup with a warm and lightly compressed attack.

Troy, MI (May 29, 2015) -- Modern vintage would be the best way to describe this new bridge pickup. It has a warm, lightly compressed attack thanks to the alnico 5 magnet, but it's wound hotter than vintage for a thick, round sound and excellent sustain. Perfect for the player who wants higher output and fatter tone than Railhammer's Hyper Vintage model, but prefers a less aggressive upper-mid/treble attack than the Chisel or Anvil models. And like all Railhammers, the extra clarity on the wound strings means they also work great with low tuned guitars.

The patent pending Railhammers are designed by award winning guitar industry veteran Joe Naylor. Thin rails under the wound strings sense a narrow section of string, producing a tight, clear tone. Large poles under the plain strings sense a wide section of string, producing a fat, thick tone. This allows players to dial in a tight clear tone on the wound strings without the plain strings sounding thin or sterile. The result is improved clarity and tonal balance across all the strings.

Touch sensitivity, sustain, and harmonic content are also enhanced by the extremely efficient magnetic structure, and the elimination of any moving parts. The strong magnetic field also prevents any dead spots when bending strings (including on the round pole side).

Other features include: universal spacing, German silver cover, brass baseplate, four-conductor wiring with independent ground (allows custom wiring such as phase, series/parallel, etc.) and height tapered rails which contributes to consistent volume across all the strings. Available in chrome or black.

$99 street

For more information:
Railhammer

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