Rockn Stompn Releases RS-4 Power Strip

A foot-activated sequential power strip perfect for guitar rigs with multiple amps or processors.

Atlanta, GA (June 18, 2015) -- The Rockn Stompn RS-4 foot-activated sequential power strip is designed to automatically power up or down a musician's set of gear in the proper sequence, every time, providing protection and convenience on stage or in the studio.

"Musicians know the importance of powering up and down gear in the right order to avoid power surges and pops, but it's not always easy to do," says Kimball Magee of Rockn Stompn. "The RS-4's four-step power sequencer automates this process, and gives you the ability to safely power up far more gear than ever before on a single 15 amp circuit. By consolidating all your gear into one power strip you greatly reduce noise and potential hazards created by external ground loops."

Previously, pro audio power sequencers were rack mounted and limited to large professional audio performances. The RS-4 is transportable and no rack required. "It's perfect for guitar rigs with multiple amps or multiple processors," adds Magee. "It's also great for bass, keyboard rigs, PA systems, and home studios to protect amps and speakers."

Every musician or band's rig is different. To allow for varying power-up times for both vintage tube amps and modern solid state equipment, the RS-4 delay for both on and off sequences are user adjustable from 1 to 15 seconds, ensuring equipment will perform better and last longer. The unit also provides surge protection, EMI/RFI noise filtering, power conditioning, and over-voltage/over-current protection.

The Rockn Stompn power strip is the result of decades of engineering and manufacturing knowledge, and four years of intense research and development in collaboration between engineers and musicians to produce the ultimate power strip for musicians. With a fully welded stainless steel enclosure, the RS-4 is American-made and comes with a lifetime warranty.

"As musicians, we are very invested in our gear," sums up Magee. "Looking after the power requirements is an often overlooked, but important element in making it last for a very long time."

$299 street

For more information:
Rockn Stompn

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x