Ten volume pedal options aimed at making guitarists feel swell.

A volume pedal may not be the sexiest effect on a pedalboard, but for many, going without hands-free volume control—not to mention all the other interesting things you can do with one—is a scary thought. Here are 10 that’ll help you get your swell on.

LEHLE

Mono Volume
The magnetic sensor in this pedal allows it to run nearly wear-free, and its buffered direct output can be used to supply a DAW, tuner, or second amp without affecting the sound.
$279 street
lehle.com

DOD

Mini Volume
Sized right to maximize pedalboard space, this pedal features a long-throw treadle for full range of control, a built-in treble-bleed circuit, and a gear drive for worry-free performance.
$99 street
digitech.com

JIM DUNLOP

DVP4
At about half the size of its big-brother DVP3, this mini features adjustable rocker tension, a low-friction band drive for durable action, and expression-pedal mode with the flip of a switch.
$119 street
jimdunlop.com

ERNIE BALL

MVP
Housed in aircraft-grade aluminum and designed to provide an ultra-smooth foot sweep, the MVP features a powerful gain boost permitting an increase of the audio signal up to 20 dB.
$154 street
ernieball.com

SONUUS

Voluum
Much more than a standard volume pedal, the Voluum also boasts onboard features such as a chromatic tuner and five effects including compression and tremolo.
$299 street
sonuus.com

GOODRICH SOUND

H-120 Standard
Whether you’re behind a pedal steel or a 6-string, this stomp features dual outputs and is equipped with an Ultra Life million-cycle potentiometer to ensure many hours of trouble-free use.
$229 street
goodrichsoundcompany.com

HILTON ELECTRONICS

Pro Guitar
Built to last and adjustable, these volume pedals house an internal preamp that’s responsible for helping to preserve pickup frequency response at any volume.
$319 street
hiltonelectronics.com

MISSION ENGINEERING

VM-1 Aero
The ergonomically designed VM-1 Aero features an illuminating base and houses a passive “no tone suck” circuit, an isolated tuner out, and an integrated mode switch.
$179 street
missionengineering.com

CLASSIC AUDIO EFFECTS

Passive Volume Roller G2This pedal incorporates a unique Kevlar drive-belt system and preserves real estate by trading the treadle for a roller to manipulate volume.
$119 street
classicaudiofx.com

ELECTRO-HARMONIX

Volume
This lightweight-yet-rugged volume pedal features smooth action and a selectable high- or low-impedance switch for universal compatibility.
$63 street
ehx.com

A maze of modulation and reverberations leads down many colorful tone vortices.

Deep clanging reverb tones. Unexpected reverb/modulation combinations.

Steep learning curve for a superficially simple pedal.

$209

SolidGoldFX Ether
solidgoldfx.com

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A lot of cruel fates can befall a gig. But unless you’re a complete pedal addict or live in high-gain-only realms, doing a gig with just a reverb- and tremolo-equipped amp is not one of them. Usually a nice splash of reverb makes the lamest tone pretty okay. Add a little tremolo on top and you have to work to not be at least a little funky, surfy, or spacy. You see, reverb and modulation go together like beans and rice. That truth, it seems, extends even to maximalist expressions of that formula—like the SolidGold FX Ether.

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Megadeth founder teams up with Gibson for his first acoustic guitar in the Dave Mustaine Collection.

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Gibson 1960 Les Paul 0 8145 is from the final year of the model’s original-production era, and likely from one of the later runs.

The story of 1960 Gibson Les Paul 0 8145—a ’burst with a nameplate and, now, a reputation.

These days it’s difficult to imagine any vintage Gibson Les Paul being a tough sell, but there was a time when 1960 ’bursts were considered less desirable than the ’58s and ’59s of legend—even though Clapton played a ’60 cherry sunburst in his Bluesbreakers days. Such was the case in the mid 1990s, when the family of a local musician who was the original owner of one of these guitars walked into Rumble Seat Music’s original Ithaca, New York, store with this column’s featured instrument.

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