Fender expands their Modern Player line with bass and guitar versions of the Coronado and Starcaster models.

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Fender Modern Player Coronado bass

Scottsdale, AZ (September 6, 2013) -- Fender is proud to reintroduce some of the most fabled and oft-requested instruments in our history, the Starcaster and Coronado guitars and basses, as the newest additions to the popular Modern Player series.

The Starcaster guitar is back. Virtually fabled since its original mid-to-late ’70s tenure, the seldom-seen Starcaster occupies a special place in our history as Fender’s one and only offset-waist semi-hollow electric guitar. Prized decades later by a new generation of adventurous guitarists with a flair for appealingly unconventional Fender style, the Starcaster now returns in fabulous new Modern Player form with greater sound, build and beauty that’ll have you seeing stars.

The Fender Starcaster guitar’s thin semi-hollow offset body has a bound maple top and back, with stylish bound f holes. Its “C”-shaped maple neck has a 9.5”-radius maple fingerboard with 22 medium jumbo frets, black-dot inlays and the distinctively curvaceous Starcaster headstock. Other premium features include full-voiced dual Fender Wide Range humbucking pickups with three-way toggle switching, three-ply black pickguard, four skirted “amp”-style control knobs (volume and tone for each pickup) and an Adjusto-Matic™ bridge with anchored tailpiece. Available in gorgeous Natural, Black and Aged Cherry Burst gloss finishes.

In addition, Fender introduces a new model of what is surely one of its rarest-ever instruments, the semi-hollow Starcaster Bass. Only a handful of prototype models appeared during the mid 1970s, unusually distinctive as the only offset semi-hollow bass guitar in Fender history (to say nothing of its two enormous humbucking pickups). After decades of virtually fabled status, the Starcaster Bass now reappears in electrifying Modern Player form with superior sound, build and beauty ideal for bassists with a flair for appealingly unconventional Fender style.

The Fender Starcaster Bass guitar’s thin semi-hollow offset body has a bound maple top and back, with stylish bound f-holes. A short-scale bass (30”), it has a “C”-shaped maple neck topped by the distinctively curvaceous Starcaster headstock, and a 9.5”-radius maple fingerboard with 22 medium jumbo frets and black-dot inlays. Other premium features include dual Fender Wide Range humbucking bass pickups with three-way toggle switching, four skirted “amp”-style control knobs (volume and tone for each pickup) and a four-saddle Fender Hi-Mass bridge. Available in gorgeous Natural, Black and Aged Cherry Burst gloss finishes.

The Coronado guitar is back, with greater sound, build and beauty than ever for the guitarist who appreciates a different Fender guitar with a special history. In the mid-to-late 1960s, the Coronado family was Fender’s first foray into the hollow-body electric guitar world. Now the Coronado name and style returns to Fender as an utterly cool new guitar in the Modern Player family, with stunning looks, tone and features.

The Fender Coronado guitar’s thin semi-hollow maple body has an alder center-block and bound top and back, with stylish bound f holes. Its “C”-shaped maple neck has a 9.5”-radius white-bound rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium jumbo frets and elegant white pearloid block inlays. Other distinctive features include dual Fideli’Tron humbucking pickups with three-way toggle switching, three-ply black pickguard, four skirted “amp”-style control knobs (volume and tone for each pickup) and an Adjusto-Matic bridge with floating “F” trapeze tailpiece. Available in gorgeous 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red and Black Cherry Burst gloss finishes.

In addition, the Coronado Bass guitar is back, with greater sound, build and beauty than ever for the bassist who appreciates a different Fender bass with a special history. In the mid-to-late 1960s, the Coronado family was Fender’s first foray into the hollow-body electric instrument world. Now the Coronado name and style returns to Fender as an utterly cool new bass in the Modern Player family, with stunning looks, tone and features.

The Fender Coronado Bass guitar’s thin semi-hollow maple body has an alder center-block and bound top and back, with stylish bound f-holes. Its “C”-shaped maple neck has a 9.5”-radius white-bound rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium jumbo frets and elegant white pearloid block inlays. Other distinctive features include dual Fideli’Tron™ humbucking pickups with three-way toggle switching, three-ply black pickguard, four skirted “amp”-style control knobs (volume and tone for each pickup) and an Adjusto-Matic bridge with floating “F” trapeze tailpiece. Available in gorgeous 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red and Black Cherry Burst gloss finishes.

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