A brand-new model that shares specs from Parnell's '57 goldtop.

Nashville, TN (June 11, 2019) -- Lee Roy Parnell's immense talent and soulful approach has made him an icon in the music world, but his discriminating taste and emphasis on tone has made him a legend in the guitar community. His '57 Goldtop signature model from Gibson Custom Shop became an instant classic for this reason, and it continues to be sought-after by collectors and guitarists worldwide. Lee Roy and the talented luthiers at Gibson Custom Shop took notice, and so began the process of creating a new version based on a flametop '59 Burst instead of a '57 Goldtop. The construction elements remain the same, from the contoured cutaway edge to the revised pickup routes, which Lee Roy prefers in order to capture more character from the wood. Each features a hand-picked figured maple top accented by an "Abilene Sunset Fade" burst, inspired by Lee Roy's hometown in Texas. Under the hood, each guitar features an underwound '57 Classic humbucker in the neck, an underwound '57 Classic Plus in the bridge, and the all-new Vintage Tone Circuit which uses paper-in-oil capacitors and vintage taper potentiometers.

Street price: $7,499

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