Hofner Releases the 60th Anniversary 500/1 Violin Bass

A strictly limited edition of 60 instruments to celebrate 60 years of the 500/1 Violin Bass.

Germany (March 8, 2016) -- Hofner are pleased to announce the release of the 60th Anniversary 500/1 Violin Bass. A strictly limited edition of 60 instruments to celebrate 60 years of the 500/1 Violin Bass is now available from selected dealers. The 500/1 Violin Bass, designed by Walter Höfner, was first shown to the public at the Frankfurt Musikmesse in 1956.

The 60th Anniversary bass, finished in stunning black and white, has a number of key features and unique points.

The artwork on the top of the bass was designed for Höfner by Klaus Voormann who is very closely associated with The Beatles and is the designer of the cover of the world famous Revolver album. This album celebrates its 50th anniversary since release and accordingly the artwork for the bass is in the same unique style. Each bass comes with a Certificate of Authenticity which has been personally signed by Klaus Voormann.

The headstock of the bass has the original 1956 design, not used before on any re-issue instruments. All hardware on the bass is in black. The strings are Höfner black tape-wound. The original style oval control panel has been used and specially produced in white and black.

Features:

  • Certificate of Authenticity personally signed by Klaus Voormann.
  • Limited Edition (60 only) art print of the Klaus Voormann design (only available with this bass).
  • Prints of Klaus Voormann (only available with this bass).
  • 60th Anniversary coffee cup (only available with this bass).
  • 60th Anniversary pen and box (only available with this bass).
  • White Höfner strap (only available with this bass).
  • Höfner Limited Edition handmade bass fuzz FX pedal.
  • Höfner music CD.
  • Set of "Teacup" knobs.

The bass, which is numbered, is supplied in the Höfner H259B bullet case. Of the 60 there are 6 available as left handed. These are particularly desirable as they contain an extra graphic on the top design. No Ignition or Contemporary versions or copies will be made.

For more information:
Hofner

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