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Top 10 Rig Rundowns of 2020

Top 10 Rig Rundowns of 2020

COVID-19 shut down tours, but it didn't stop our gear envy. The most-watched episodes include YouTuber Rick Beato, Nashville session ace Tom Bukovac, Intervals' Aaron Marshall, Deep Sea Diver's Jessica Dobson, and others.

10. (B) Brendan Benson

A trip into the bona fide Raconteurs guitarist's inner lair of rare vintage acoustics, super vibey amps, and a few choice goldtops.

Full Article & Photos.


 

10. (A) Elder

Swooshing Pink Floyd vibes, kerranging Sleep chugs, and mutating mellow Motorpsycho tones symbiotically swirl in this guitar duo’s growing setups.

Full Article & Photos.


 

9. Nick Perri

The retro rocker opens up about retrofitting reissues, returning to the JTM45s, and finding the piece of gear that changed his life.

Full Article & Photos.


 

8. Deep Sea Diver's Jessica Dobson

“Strangled cat" and "glassy Jonny Greenwood” are just two attitudes the former Beck and Shins sidewoman engages in her band’s adventurous indie-rock.

Full Article & Photos.


 

7. Jared James Nichols

No picks needed for this high-octane blues rocker, who keeps it simple with a single-P-90 signature Epiphone and namesake Blackstar head that doubles as his carry-on.

Full Article & Photos.


 

6. Opeth

The Swedish prog-metal sorcerers dish on their longstanding PRS ties and uncover why they traded traditional tube amps for swappable high-gain Synergy modules.

Full Article & Photos.


 

5. Albert Lee

A bona fide twang-guitar legend shares stories of his time with Clapton and gives an inside look at how he approaches his signature sound.

Full Article & Photos.


 

4. Intervals

Prog-metal architect Aaron Marshall shows off a pair of dazzling Mayones prototypes before he explains using a small digital footprint for tons of tones.

Full Article & Photos.


 

3. Josh Smith

A bona fide blues shredder breaks down his powerful pedalboard and rips some licks on his trusty Chapin T-style.

Full Article & Photos.


 

2. Tom Bukovac

When you’re one of the most recorded guitarists in Nashville, you make sure you can cover all the bases. Watch this in-depth look at the amazing vintage guitars, rare amps, and massive pedalboard that inspires one of Nashville’s first-call session players.

Full Article & Photos.


 

1. Rick Beato

One of YouTube’s leading music authorities opens up his well-stocked studio and shares the stories behind some of his most cherished gear.

Full Article & Photos.


With a team of experts on hand, we look at six workhorse vintage amps you can still find for around $1,000 or less.

If you survey the gear that shows up on stages and studios for long enough, you’ll spot some patterns in the kinds of guitar amplification players are using. There’s the rotating cast of backline badasses that do the bulk of the work cranking it out every day and night—we’re all looking at you, ’65 Deluxe Reverb reissue.

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Amazon Prime Day is here (July 16-17). Whether you're a veteran player or just picking up your first guitar, these are some bargains you don't want to miss. Check out more deals here! https://amzn.to/3LskPRV

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A technicolor swirl of distortion, drive, boost, and ferocious fuzz.

Summons a wealth of engaging, and often unique, boost, drive, distortion, and fuzz tones that deviate from common templates. Interactive controls.

Finding just-right tones, while rewarding, might demand patience from less assured and experienced drive-pedal users. Tone control could be more nuanced.

$199

Danelectro Nichols 1966
danelectro.com

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The Danelectro Nichols 1966, in spite of its simplicity, feels and sounds like a stompbox people will use in about a million different ways. Its creator, Steve Ridinger, who built the first version as an industrious Angeleno teen in 1966, modestly calls the China-made Nichols 1966 a cross between a fuzz and a distortion. And, at many settings, it is most certainly that.

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The author standing next to a Richardson gunstock lathe purchased from Gibson’s Kalamazoo factory. It was used to make six necks at a time at Gibson in the 1950s and 1960s.

Keep your head down and put in the work if you want to succeed in the gear-building business.

The accelerated commodification of musical instruments during the late 20th century conjures up visions of massive factories churning out violins, pianos, and, of course, fretted instruments. Even the venerable builders of the so-called “golden age” were not exactly the boutique luthier shops of our imagination.

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