ZT Amplifiers Announces the Custom Shop Jazz Club Amp

The model was developed with input from several prominent jazz guitarists including Vic Juris, Dave Stryker, Charlie Apicella, and Randy Vincent.

Benicia, CA (December 6, 2018) -- ZT Amplifiers’ Custom Shop has released the Jazz Club amp, a high-powered, lightweight 1x12” combo with a unique, sleek cosmetic appeal, specially designed for jazz players, and built in ZT’s California facility.

The Jazz Club model was developed with input from several prominent jazz guitarists including Vic Juris, Dave Stryker, Charlie Apicella, and Randy Vincent. Headroom is exceptional thanks to the 220-watt power amp and robust speaker. Offering beautiful clean tones at very high volume and extended low frequencies, it is ideally suited for archtop jazz guitars, but versatile enough for any musical style. The cabinet is finished in an extremely durable, yet elegant, midnight blue textured paint.

The Jazz Club features include:

  • Compact (15”x14”x11”) & lightweight (25 lbs.) for easy transport
  • Minimalist control set (Gain, Bass, Mid, Treble, Volume, Reverb) for ease of use
  • 220W RMS Class-D power amplifier
  • Custom designed ultra-power 12” neodymium speaker
  • EFX Loop, DI Output (XLR), & Extension Speaker Output
  • 115V/230V Voltage Select for international use
  • Made in USA

The Jazz Club street price is $1,299 and is available both direct and through select dealers.

For more information:
ZT Amplifiers

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