Amptweaker Releases the PressuRizer

This compressor/limiter pedal boasts features such as a 3-way bloom switch, wet/dry blend, and a boost knob.

Cumming, GA (January 25, 2017) -- Sustain without compression...a common suggestion Amptweaker receives that means “don’t mess with my attack.” The Amptweaker PressuRizer compressor accomplishes this in several unique ways and includes a built-in output FET limiter/booster, making this a powerful clean-tone tweaker. Using parallel studio-grade compression with wet/dry blend, and some unusual side-chain variations, it varies from smooth compression that limits the initial "whack" to a dry-blended approach that adds compression after a short delay.

The Bloom switch (fast/off/slow) rewires the side-chain detector so the signal compresses and then grows. When blended with dry, the result sounds normal at first, and then blooms like a great Les Paul. The tone only affects the compressed signal and boosts highs to cut through, or cuts midrange to help match the blooming tone to the dry. The limiter switch adds a FET booster after the blend, and can be set to soft for barely limiting, hard for a slightly broken-up sound, or off for no limiting. This FET limiter has a very rounded breakup, similar to output tubes.

Since many always leave their compressor on, the PressuRizer has a cool 2-step footswitch. Normally it’s a true bypass on/off switch, but if you press and hold the PressuRizer's switch, it locks the compressor on, and then tapping kicks in another boost knob on the side of the pedal. So, you can get a 1–2 punch with a single-button pedal!

For more information:
Amptweaker

On Black Midi's Cavalcade, Geordie Greep’s fretwork is an example of the 6-string as a capable component as much as a solo instrument, never completely stealing the show.

Popular music and mainstream tastes may be more fractured than ever, but the guitar continues to thrive.

As we soft launch into the new year, I’m not waiting for the requisite guitar obituary in the news. It’s not going to happen again anytime soon. Why? Because as far as the mainstream media is concerned, our beloved instrument is not only dead, it's irrelevant to the point of not even being an afterthought. When the New York Times published their most recent albums of the year list, there was barely a guitar-based recording to be found. Still, there is not only hope, but also cause for jubilation.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x