A faithful recreation of Slash's coveted 1966 model with a few wiring modifications.

Nashville, TN (September 12, 2019) -- Gibson proudly presents the Slash 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck. A pre-sale is officially underway now for the Slash 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck guitars, sold through select Authorized Gibson dealers and available in-store October 1.

Over the years, Slash’s rise to rock royalty has featured a variety of iconic Gibson guitars, but it was the 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck that both diversified his sound and solidified his guitar god aesthetic. SLASH bought it from a small music store in Indiana in 1990 and put it into rotation almost immediately. Using the natural chime and chorus of the twelve-string neck and composing epic solos on the other, became a favorite tool for studio and stage and an indelible part of Slash’s signature sound. Gibson is proud to present this exact replica of the original guitar, constructed and aged by the skilled craftspeople at the Gibson Custom Shop in Nashville, TN. Each Slash 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck will be hand-signed by Slash himself and includes a striking vintage replica hardshell case, a custom Slash concho guitar strap and a Certificate of Authenticity.

Slash says of the new 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck, “Excited to announce that I’ve partnered with Gibson to offer an incredible copy of my 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck, limited edition and signed. Available at select dealers worldwide October 1."

“Slash continues to inspire legions of players all over the globe,” adds Cesar Gueikian, Chief Merchant Officer at Gibson. “The creation of new 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck is the perfect way to pay homage to Slash’s extreme talent and share a favorite guitar with generations to come.”

The release of the new Slash 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck comes as Slash and his band, Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy And The Conspirators recently wrapped their 2018-2019 headlining world tour in support of their most recent studio album, the critically acclaimed Living the Dream. Living the Dream (Snakepit Records/RoadRunner Records) is the third full-length offering from Slash Ft Myles Kennedy And the Conspirators.

Fans can purchase or stream the new album Living the Dream. Catch Slash and his 1966 EDS-1275 Doubleneck live in action this fall as he rejoins his Guns N’ Roses bandmates for the next leg of their Not In This Lifetime tour, which restarts at the end of September.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Gibson

How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 12854 site_id=20368559 original_filename="Britpop-Dec21.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/12854/Britpop-Dec21.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 12854, u'media_html': u'Britpop-Dec21.pdf'}

When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

Read More Show less

"'If I fall and somehow my career ends on that particular day, then so be it," Joe Bonamassa says of his new hobby, bicycling. "If it's over, it's over. You've got to enjoy your life."

Photo by Steve Trager

For his stylistically diverse new album, the fiery guitar hero steps back from his gear obsession and focuses on a deep pool of influences and styles.

Twenty years ago, Joe Bonamassa was a struggling musician living in New York City. He survived on a diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen noodles that he procured from the corner bodega at Columbus Avenue and 83rd Street. Like many dreamers waiting for their day in the sun, Joe also played "Win for Life" every week. It was, in his words, "literally my ticket out of this hideous business." While the lottery tickets never brought in the millions, Joe's smokin' guitar playing on a quartet of albums from 2002 to 2006—So, It's Like That, Blues Deluxe, Had to Cry Today, and You & Me—did get the win, transforming Joe into a guitar megastar.

Read More Show less
x