Washburn have announced the addition of Warren Haynes to their artist roster along with a new signature model acoustic.

Chicago, IL (February 19, 2013) -- Washburn Guitars is excited to announce that Allman Brothers Band and Gov't Mule legendary guitarist, Warren Haynes, is joining the Washburn family. Warren will be playing and endorsing the new Washburn WSD5249 Warren Haynes Signature Model acoustic guitar. This Made in USA model represents the pinnacle of Washburn acoustic guitar artistry while celebrating Washburn's 130 year heritage and fits perfectly with an artist of Haynes' caliber.

The WSD5249 comes equipped with D'Addario strings and has a voice all its own that is sweet, articulate, airy and refined - perfect for fingerstyle, slide or any style where individual string definition is required.

As current vocalist and guitarist in both Gov't Mule, The Allman Brothers and Warren Haynes Band, Warren is perhaps the hardest working musician in rock. He is known for his extremely tasty and heartfelt playing and is very particular about his tone. In addition to his heavy touring schedule, he does solo acoustic shows and sits in with others whenever he can. The list of people he's played or jammed with reads like a who's who of famous and world class musicians of varying styles including Eric Clapton, Steve Miller, Peter Frampton, Bob Dylan, BB King, Coheed and Cambria, Sheryl Crow, Dave Matthews and performed as a member of The Dead on their 2004 & 2009 reunion tours. And that's just the short list and part of the reason he took the #23 slot on Rolling Stone Magazine's top 100 guitarists of all time.

Proudly hand-built in the Buffalo Grove, USA Factory, the Washburn WSD5249 acoustic guitar is based on the original Washburn Solo Deluxe from 1937, which is similar in size to the popular OM shaped guitars commonly found on the market today. We feature a premium Adirondack Spruce top with period-correct vintage sunburst finish. Hand-shaped scalloped Adirondack Spruce bracing masterfully joins the top and solid rosewood sides while the beautiful 2-piece back is split by a vintage-inspired '30s zipper-style inlaid herringbone stripe. The top is framed-out beautifully by 3-ply ivoroid binding and the sound hole is expertly bound and finished by a gorgeous ringed herringbone rosette. The hand-cut tortoise-shell celluloid pickguard rounds out the vintage vibe while the fully-carved solid ebony bridge supports a compensated bone saddle for improved intonation, delicately nuanced tone and singing sustain.

The comfortable, soft V shaped mahogany neck joins the body at the 14th fret and is adorned with a '30s style rosewood capped headstock with intricately inlaid pearl appointments and period-correct Washburn logo. High quality Grover® Butterbean tuners ensure smooth, high-ratio tuning accuracy and unmatched stability. The seamlessly bound ebony fingerboard couples perfectly with the ebony bridge and the bone nut finishes the expertly crafted instrument ensuring every nuance was attended to.

The WSD5249 has a Suggested Retail Price of $5,332.00 and includes a hardshell case.

For more information:
Washburn

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