Full Compass Systems Introduces Exclusive G&L Tribute Series Fallout Guitar

Based on the venerable SC-2 model, the Swamp Ash Fallout includes a G&L Saddle Lock bridge for increased sustain and Paul Gagon-designed Alnico pickups.

Madison, WI (March 11, 2014) -- Full Compass Systems has partnered with G&L Guitars to release an exclusive version of the popular Fallout electric guitar. The Tribute Series Swamp Ash Fallout is a limited edition run of 92 instruments featuring a unique broad-grained Swamp Ash body with a Clear Orange finish matched with a classic vintage-tint neck.

Based on the venerable SC-2 model, the Swamp Ash Fallout includes a G&L Saddle Lock bridge for increased sustain and Paul Gagon-designed Alnico pickups. The articulate P-90 neck pickup offers sparkling clarity while the humbucking pickup in the bridge adds either girth or bite via the push/pull tone potentiometer coil split. This tonal flexibility makes the Swamp Ash Fallout the ideal instrument for players of any genre - from dirty, grunting low-end riffing to sparkly, chiming chord work, this guitar punches well above its weight.

G&L is a company with rich ties to tradition - founded by Leo Fender in 1980, in Fullerton, California, the Birthplace of Bolt-on™, G&L continues to follow Leo’s ethic of continuing improvement and refinement, never resting on laurels, and always striving to find a better way to do things.

“G&L was an obvious partner for us due to their history of innovation tied to tradition”, stated Full Compass Musical Instrument Product Specialist, James Jones. “We’re very excited to be able to offer these unique instruments at a price that’s affordable for working musicians.”

The Tribute Series Swamp Ash Fallout is available today for $449.00, exclusively at Full Compass Systems.

For more information:
Full Compass

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